The Cadets

IT’S BACK

The classic Cadets Uniform returns to the field for 2021

An icon in the DCI community, The Cadets Uniform demands excellence. The dignified maroon jacket with hand-stitched white knots gives performers a strong, powerful upper body. The cream pants draw attention to every inconsistency, and when The Cadets take the field with clean drill and excellent technique, the effect is dazzling. The Cadets Uniform is worn with meticulous attention to detail and treated with utmost respect at all times. A Cadet never lets their Uniform touch the ground, and they carry it either hanging, facing forward, or precisely folded and tucked under their shako.

SUPPORT THE UNIFORM
Wear the uniform
Stanbury Uniforms

Cadets Arts and Entertainment, Inc., is excited to announce a renewed partnership with Stanbury Uniforms for the 2021 season. With creative designs by the legendary Greg Lagola, Stanbury will provide uniforms and costumes for The Cadets.

Founded in 1917 and headquartered in Brookfield, MO, Stanbury Uniforms draws from over 100 years of expertise to provide some of the most highly regarded uniforms in the activity. Over the years Stanbury has expanded to three production facilities in Missouri, ensuring that all uniforms are made proudly in the United States. This past year, Stanbury became a proud member of the Varsity Spirit family and continues its mission of elevating the student experience through Varsity Performing Arts. More information about Stanbury Uniforms can be found at stanbury.com.

We are excited to partner with The Cadets and to help make the return to their traditional uniform for 2021 a reality. The Cadets have a such a rich history of excellence and perseverance – and so do we. This is a great opportunity for Stanbury Uniforms and Varsity Performing Arts to continue our ongoing support for the activity. We look forward to being a part of the future for The Cadets and DCI.

Steve Roberts, General Manager - Stanbury Uniforms

I am very excited for The Cadets to partner with this great company in 2021 and beyond. Speaking from decades of experience with Stanbury, their creativity, customer service, and manufacturing is exceptional. I am looking forward to bringing Stanbury’s products back home to The Cadets.

Denise Bonfiglio, CEO - Cadets Arts & Entertainment

Wearing the West-Point uniform has always been a dream that I never thought would be a reality for my generation of Cadets. The 2021 Cadets are a deserving group of that honor. These members have stuck with this organization through unprecedented times, and we are so excited to bring a new era of excellence to the uniform.

Loren Gregory, Drum Major - The Cadets

The Cadets have gone through a lot of change the past few years and the one thing I’ve always identified with the corps is the uniform. To wear the maroon and gold next summer will launch the corps to a new era of Cadet excellence in the activity, while going back to our roots and honoring those that came before us. I couldn’t see it happening any other way.

Sharbel Skaff, Horn Sergeant - The Cadets

Through changing times and mounting challenges, The Cadets have always remained disciplined and driven to work harder than anyone else. The return of the maroon and gold, in the midst of some of the greatest tests to the corps and the activity as a whole, upholds those virtues when we need them most. I’m thrilled and honored to wear the iconic Cadets uniform in 2021.

Zach Tarman, Battery Captain - The Cadets

ABOUT THE UNIFORM

ABOUT THE UNIFORM

The Cadets Shako and Plume


THE Shako and Plume

Since 1938, The Cadets have worn a maroon and white shako with a silver eagle. A white plume adds a full foot of height, making the corps stand tall and proud. To ensure the proper angle, Cadets measure two fingers between their nose and the shako’s brim. The chin strap rests just below the performer’s bottom lip. When it is not being worn, performers carry their shakos respectfully and always upright, with three fingers centered under the eagle.

The Cadets Shako and Plume

THE Shako and Plume

Since 1938, The Cadets have worn a maroon and white shako with a silver eagle. A white plume adds a full foot of height, making the corps stand tall and proud. To ensure the proper angle, Cadets measure two fingers between their nose and the shako’s brim. The chin strap rests just below the performer’s bottom lip. When it is not being worn, performers carry their shakos respectfully and always upright, with three fingers centered under the eagle.

The Cadets Shako and Plume

THE Shako and Plume

Since 1938, The Cadets have worn a maroon and white shako with a silver eagle. A white plume adds a full foot of height, making the corps stand tall and proud. To ensure the proper angle, Cadets measure two fingers between their nose and the shako’s brim. The chin strap rests just below the performer’s bottom lip. When it is not being worn, performers carry their shakos respectfully and always upright, with three fingers centered under the eagle.

THE BUCKLE

Every Cadet’s crossbelt is worn at the same angle with the top corner of the buckle fastened just below the second silver button so that it is uniformly centered on the chest. Worn close to the heart, a Cadet’s buckle is the most personal element of their uniform, and they traditionally keep the same buckle throughout their years in the corps. Before every performance, Cadets wish each other a great show by knocking twice on each other’s buckles and giving a sincere hug.

The Cadets Buckle

THE BUCKLE

Every Cadet’s crossbelt is worn at the same angle with the top corner of the buckle fastened just below the second silver button so that it is uniformly centered on the chest. Worn close to the heart, a Cadet’s buckle is the most personal element of their uniform, and they traditionally keep the same buckle throughout their years in the corps. Before every performance, Cadets wish each other a great show by knocking twice on each other’s buckles and giving a sincere hug.

The Cadets Buckle

THE BUCKLE

Every Cadet’s crossbelt is worn at the same angle with the top corner of the buckle fastened just below the second silver button so that it is uniformly centered on the chest. Worn close to the heart, a Cadet’s buckle is the most personal element of their uniform, and they traditionally keep the same buckle throughout their years in the corps. Before every performance, Cadets wish each other a great show by knocking twice on each other’s buckles and giving a sincere hug.

The Cadets Buckle
The Cadets Chevrons

the chevrons

White knots and pronounced silver buttons add a vintage feel to the stately maroon jacket. The white accents on The Cadets Uniform are all precisely hand-stitched to achieve a clean look between performers. A Cadet’s sleeve has three white, knotted Vs which served as the inspiration for the corps’ modern chevron logo.

The Cadets Chevrons

the chevrons

White knots and pronounced silver buttons add a vintage feel to the stately maroon jacket. The white accents on The Cadets Uniform are all precisely hand-stitched to achieve a clean look between performers. A Cadet’s sleeve has three white, knotted Vs which served as the inspiration for the corps’ modern chevron logo.

The Cadets Chevrons

the chevrons

White knots and pronounced silver buttons add a vintage feel to the stately maroon jacket. The white accents on The Cadets Uniform are all precisely hand-stitched to achieve a clean look between performers. A Cadet’s sleeve has three white, knotted Vs which served as the inspiration for the corps’ modern chevron logo.

 

 

the gold cummerbund
and drop sash

The gleaming gold cummerbund and drop sash complete the uniform. Cummerbunds are uniformly worn with crumb-catchers down, and the drop sash is precisely positioned with the tassel centered on the pin stripe of the left pant leg. Despite more modern designs that incorporated Velcro, The Cadets continued the tradition of “pinning in” — meaning a Cadet could only close their cummerbund with the help of a fellow Cadet who would safety pin it shut to ensure it would never come open in the intense physical demands of a show.

The Cadets Cummerbund and Drop Sash
The Cadets Cummerbund and Drop Sash

the gold cummerbund and drop sash

The gleaming gold cummerbund and drop sash complete the uniform. Cummerbunds are uniformly worn with crumb-catchers down, and the drop sash is precisely positioned with the tassel centered on the pin stripe of the left pant leg. Despite more modern designs that incorporated Velcro, The Cadets continued the tradition of “pinning in” — meaning a Cadet could only close their cummerbund with the help of a fellow Cadet who would safety pin it shut to ensure it would never come open in the intense physical demands of a show.

the gold cummerbund and drop sash

The gleaming gold cummerbund and drop sash complete the uniform. Cummerbunds are uniformly worn with crumb-catchers down, and the drop sash is precisely positioned with the tassel centered on the pin stripe of the left pant leg. Despite more modern designs that incorporated Velcro, The Cadets continued the tradition of “pinning in” — meaning a Cadet could only close their cummerbund with the help of a fellow Cadet who would safety pin it shut to ensure it would never come open in the intense physical demands of a show.

The Cadets Cummerbund and Drop Sash
The Cadets Pinstripe

the PINSTRIPE

The most telling element of The Cadets Uniform is a stark, maroon pinstripe down the outside each pant leg. It accentuates any variations in the straight-leg marching technique and proudly emphasizes perfection. Every year, The Cadets learn the technique from scratch in order to eventually achieve a uniform look. This begins with the corps’ trademark right-foot step-off which was first introduced by George Zingali. Looking back to 1985, the right-foot lead was used to break rookies’ old marching habits, help with odd-numbered-count sets, and bring some dance elements into militaristic marching.

The Cadets Pinstripe

the PINSTRIPE

The most telling element of The Cadets Uniform is a stark, maroon pinstripe down the outside each pant leg. It accentuates any variations in the straight-leg marching technique and proudly emphasizes perfection. Every year, The Cadets learn the technique from scratch in order to eventually achieve a uniform look. This begins with the corps’ trademark right-foot step-off which was first introduced by George Zingali. Looking back to 1985, the right-foot lead was used to break rookies’ old marching habits, help with odd-numbered-count sets, and bring some dance elements into militaristic marching.

The Cadets Pinstripe

the PINSTRIPE

The most telling element of The Cadets Uniform is a stark, maroon pinstripe down the outside each pant leg. It accentuates any variations in the straight-leg marching technique and proudly emphasizes perfection. Every year, The Cadets learn the technique from scratch in order to eventually achieve a uniform look. This begins with the corps’ trademark right-foot step-off which was first introduced by George Zingali. Looking back to 1985, the right-foot lead was used to break rookies’ old marching habits, help with odd-numbered-count sets, and bring some dance elements into militaristic marching.

SUPPORT THE CADETS IN 2021

The Cadets will proudly don the maroon and gold this year, as they bring the corps’ rich tradition into a new decade of excellence in the marching arts. Please give a gift to support our 2021 season.

GIVE NOW

SUPPORT THE CADETS IN 2021

The Cadets will proudly don the maroon and gold this year, as they bring the corps’ rich tradition into a new decade of excellence in the marching arts. Please give a gift to support our 2021 season.

GIVE NOW

SUPPORT THE CADETS IN 2021

The Cadets will proudly don the maroon and gold this year, as they bring the corps’ rich tradition into a new decade of excellence in the marching arts. Please give a gift to support our 2021 season.

GIVE NOW